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Does Your RV Need a Water Pressure Regulator?

Does Your RV Need a Water Pressure Regulator?

Does Your RV Need a Water Pressure Regulator?

A water pressure regulator may seem like a small piece of brass, but it has a big job.

This relatively inexpensive RV accessory can save you from having water damage in your RV from busted pipes and leaking fittings.

We think every RVer should have and use a regulator. Keep reading to see why we’re passionate about them!

Let’s dive in!

What Is a Water Pressure Regulator?

A water pressure regulator limits the pressure entering your RV. It protects your plumbing system from excessive water pressure, which can cause extensive damage to pipes and fittings. You can purchase either an adjustable or fixed regulator. 

An adjustable version will allow you to set the water pressure to a specific limit. However, a fixed regulator will typically limit the pressure to 40-50 PSI. Both versions will do the job, but the most critical part is making sure you have one of them.

Does Your RV Need a Water Pressure Regulator?

Yes, a water pressure regulator keeps your RV’s plumbing system safe.

These inexpensive pieces of equipment are essential if you’re using the city connection on your RV’s water system. You could unknowingly connect your water hose to the spigot at your campsite and discover the water pressure is way too high.

The Importance of Using a Water Pressure Regulator on Your RV

While a hot shower with good water pressure is a great way to end a day full of adventures, it can be difficult in an RV. The pipes in an RV’s water system aren’t capable of handling excessive water pressure. While many of the water lines in an RV can handle 100 PSI, many manufacturers don’t recommend exceeding 60 PSI. This is why many fixed regulators only allow a maximum of 50 PSI.

When your water lines experience excessive water pressure, water lines can break, fixtures can leak, and you could end up with an expensive repair bill. If a failure does occur due to high water pressure, there’s a good chance that you won’t know there’s an issue until it’s too late.

Keep in mind: This RV Water Pressure Regulator is less than $30 on Amazon. Considering it can save your RV from potential damage, it’s an affordable and wise investment.

Benefits of an RV Water Pressure Regulator

There are multiple benefits when it comes to having and using an RV water pressure regulator. Let’s take a look so you can protect your RV!

Controls Water Pressure in Your RV

When you use a regulator, you no longer have to worry about whether the water pressure at the campsite will be too much for your RV. You can quickly and easily attach the regulator to the spigot and keep your pressure in check.

Protects Your Plumbing and Fittings

Using a regulator protects your RV’s plumbing and fittings. These components can easily be damaged when exposed to excessive water pressure. By using a regulator, you’ll know that your water lines and fittings aren’t in danger.

Helps Prevent Sediment from Entering System

A water pressure regulator not only keeps your RV plumbing and fittings safe but also filters out sediment. When large chunks of sediment get into your water system, they can cause issues for your water pump and create blockages at your faucets. Keeping sediment out of your system is essential to ensuring your water system runs efficiently.

Inexpensive and Lasts a Long Time

While many pieces of essential RV gear are on the expensive end, this isn’t one of them. You can pick up a fixed water pressure regulator for less than $10. You may even be able to find one at your local big-box store. Even if you’re looking for an adjustable regulator, you can add one to your RV supplies for around $30.

Besides their relatively low price, we love that they’re simple and last a long time. There’s nothing more frustrating than having to rebuy products because they’re cheaply made. You’ll likely be able to use your regulator for years to come. 

How to Use an RV Water Pressure Regulator

Both styles are effortless to use and can connect to your water spigot in seconds. First, tighten your regulator onto the water spigot. Then, if your regulator is adjustable, dial in the regulator to the desired pressure.

RVers love that there’s no maintenance required for these important pieces of equipment. Many RVers even keep them connected to their water hose, so there’s no additional work or effort to keep their RVs safe.

Best RV Water Pressure Regulators

When it comes to the best regulators on the market, the Renator Adjustable Water Pressure Regulator with Gauge and Screened Filter and the Camco Inline Brass Water Pressure Regulator are great options. They both use solid brass for their construction. Their biggest difference is that the Renator regulator is adjustable up to 160 PSI, and the Camco version is fixed to 40 to 50 PSI. Still, you’ll get a great product with either of these regulators. 

Protect Your RV

Doing everything to keep your RV safe is essential, especially if you want to avoid frequent trips to the repair shop. A water pressure regulator is a cheap and effective way to protect your RV’s plumbing system. The ease of installation and use makes it a no-brainer. Do you prefer a fixed or adjustable water pressure regulator?

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Justaguy

Wednesday 29th of September 2021

Every RV needs to have a water pressure regulator (one that has a dial - so when it wears out you’ll know), and Every RV also needs a Surge suppressor, to protect from electrical problems including fires. Both are minimum requirements to avoid disaster.

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