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Are Truckers Friendly to Normal Drivers?

Are Truckers Friendly to Normal Drivers?

You can’t travel the highways and interstates without seeing the massive semi-trucks hauling freight and other important loads. The men and women driving these 18-wheelers drive hundreds of miles daily to keep products on store shelves.

Over the years, truckers have developed a reputation due to a few bad apples. So are truckers friendly to regular drivers? Let’s look and see.

Are Truck Drivers Friendly?

Most truck drivers are very friendly, despite what you may have heard. These men and women drive on the highways for hours each day. Are there unfriendly truck drivers? Absolutely.

A majority of truck drivers have very short fuses when it comes to irresponsible drivers. This is largely because they spend so much time on the roads that they see people texting, speeding, and driving unsafely.

So if you engage in unsafe driving practices, don’t get caught off guard if a trucker isn’t friendly with you. They have a family to get home to and an important job that will only get delayed if you cause an accident.

What Kind of People Are Truckers?

Truck drivers come in all shapes, sizes, colors, and genders. While males once dominated the trucking industry, the Trucking Trends Report reveals that 7.8% of U.S. professional truck drivers are female. However, people who typically pursue trucking as a profession often share a few common characteristics.

Truckers often enjoy working outside and on hands-on projects. They like working in a structured environment, are detail-oriented, and are safety conscious. Trucking, like any profession, has a wide range of people.

Is Truck Driving Good for Introverts?

Truck drivers spend a majority of their time driving alone in their semi-trucks. They typically only interact with others when they pick up or drop off a load and stop for fuel.

Truck driving is an excellent option for most introverts who enjoy jobs that can provide a generous amount of solitude. Introverts who enjoy seeing new places may find truck driving an enjoyable career.

Are Truck Drivers the Safest Drivers? 

Professional truck drivers are among the safest drivers on the road. This is mainly because trucking companies require drivers to regularly inspect their vehicles, maintain them, and ensure they pass any checks by the Department of Transportation.

Truck drivers must follow strict rules regarding how much driving they can do. Drivers typically have a 14-hour window to complete no more than 11 hours of driving. They must then have 10 hours off before going again. Passenger vehicles don’t have these restrictions, leading to drowsy driving and serious accidents.

Because truck drivers depend on specific licenses, it’s much riskier for them to speed or break the law while driving. If they do, they could risk having their licenses revoked, which would ultimately cost them their job. Many truck driving companies will also install devices to monitor speed to ensure truckers drive as safely as possible.

Did You Know: This is what a trucker bomb is.

What Are the Benefits of Being a Truck Driver?

Being a truck driver can be very rewarding. You get to play a key role in the economy by hauling merchandise and other goods from the manufacturers to the stores. Without truck drivers, we would experience empty shelves and delays when ordering online. As a truck driver, you know you have people depending on you.

Another benefit of being a truck driver is that you get to see some incredible places that you might not have seen otherwise. Truck drivers log hundreds of thousands of miles and millions of miles in their careers. Truck drivers can criss-cross the country and see some incredible landscapes.

We can’t mention the benefits of trucking without highlighting the pay. For a job that requires no degree and provides training, they can get excellent pay. Drivers often start out making $50,000 a year and can quickly work their way up the scale. Walmart recently announced they would pay many of their drivers over $100,000.

What Are the Disadvantages of Being a Truck Driver?

While being a truck driver has some benefits, we can’t fail to mention the disadvantages too. Truck drivers spend much of their time on the road and in unfamiliar places. This causes those with families to be away from home for long periods. It can mean missing school events, holidays, and other family milestones.

Truck drivers can see incredible landscapes and new places, but they don’t get to stop. Because of the deadlines and complexities of hauling a large trailer, drivers can’t deviate from the planned route. Besides their mandatory stops for driving hours, they typically can only stop to get fuel, use the restroom, and eat.

One of the largest disadvantages is dealing with difficult people on the road. Seeing irresponsible and unsafe driving practices all day can get frustrating and aggravating. Truck drivers must often have a lot of patience for bad drivers, traffic jams, and construction work.

Is Being a Truck Driver Peaceful?

Being a truck driver can be very stressful. The tight deadlines and unpredictability of the road can make the lifestyle anything but peaceful. However, some may have moments of peace when driving down the open highway, enjoying a beautiful sunrise or sunset over an incredible landscape. You can listen to your favorite podcast or playlist as you pass by mile marker after mile marker.

Next time you see a truck driver, try thanking them for their service and work. They do a lot for us and have demanding jobs. It may just make their day. Have you met friendly truck drivers?

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