Skip to Content

The Burgess Falls Guide for Campers & Hikers

The Burgess Falls Guide for Campers & Hikers

The Burgess Falls Guide for Campers & Hikers

If you’re in middle Tennessee and looking for a great place to spend a day, Burgess Falls is the answer.

Hiking, waterfalls, and swimming holes are just a few of the wonderful opportunities you’ll find here.

Let’s explore!

What is Burgess Falls (and Its History)

Burgess Falls is located within Burgess Falls State Park and is operated by Tennessee State Parks. It’s located 12 miles southwest of Cookeville and, in fact, gets its name from Revolutionary War veteran, Tom Burgess.

After settling in the area in the 1810s, the Burgess family used the Falling Water River to operate a mill. Later, the city of Cookeville used the river to create hydroelectric power for the city between the years 1928-1944.

Finally, Tennessee declared it a State Natural Area in 1973. As a result, the landscape and animals are now protected for future generations to enjoy.

What City is Burgess Falls In?

Burgess Falls State Park is located in Sparta, Tennessee. The address is 4000 Burgess Falls Dr, Sparta, TN 38583. 

The Best Way to Get to Get There

The state park is located about 80 miles east of Nashville and about 18 miles south of Cookeville. Whether you’re traveling East or West, take the I-40 exit 280 to Ditty Road/TN-135 and continue south for approximately 8.5 miles.

Then, after crossing over the lake, the park entrance will be on your right.

How Do You Get to the Base of the Falls?

To access the bottom of the falls, use the Burgess Falls Trail located in Burgess Falls State Park.

Burgess Falls Trail

This trail treats you to three different waterfalls. Therefore, it’s a popular 1.6-mile out-and-back trail. It’s certainly considered good for all ages. In addition, the state park welcomes leashed dogs on the trail making this a great family hike.

Cummins Falls Trails

Cummins Falls Trail is located in Cummins Falls State Park and is a 3-mile out-and-back hike. However, it’s rated moderate to strenuous and not recommended for children under 5.

The hike can be perilous during inclement weather, as the area is prone to flash flooding. In addition, a gorge access permit is required to visit the base of the waterfall. Even so, the reward at the end of the trail is well worth it as you enjoy Tennessee’s eighth largest waterfall and a relaxing swimming hole.

Know Before You Go: Cummins Falls Trail and Waterfall present multiple hazards. Check the Cummins Falls State Park site before you head out.

The Best Campsite Near Burgess Falls

There are several great places to stay near and around Burgess Falls, but we have one fantastic recommendation for you.

Mountain Glen RV Park and Campground

Address: Mountain Glen RV Park and Campground is located at 6182 Brockdell Rd, Pikeville, TN 37367.

About the Campground: Mountain Glen RV Park and Campground has 41 full-hook-up RV sites and 8 tent sites available for guests. All RV sites are pull-through and include 20/30/50 amp service. In addition, the sites are big-rig friendly and range from 60 to 90 feet in length. Free WiFi is offered to guests, as well as a modern bathhouse. Not only is there a general store, but you will also be able to do your laundry at their coin machines. If fishing is your thing, there is a 2-acre stocked pond for catch and release fishing. 

Price: RV sites are $34 daily and $205 Weekly. On the other hand, tent sites are $24 daily for electricity and water or $22 for dry camping.

Pro Tip: Campgrounds fill up quickly, especially in the summer! Make reservations well in advance of your trip if you want to be sure of having a spot.

Beautiful Burgess Falls

Burgess Falls and the surrounding area is a lovely place to explore and adventure. With miles of trails, dozens of waterfalls, and gorgeous overlooks, you’ll easily fill your day. So, you can see why we love it.

Be sure to take lots of pictures when you go, and let us know what you think!

Discover the Best Free Camping Across the USA

To be honest with you, we hate paying for camping. There are so many free campsites in America (with complete privacy).

You should give it a try!

As a matter of fact, these free campsites are yours. Every time you pay federal taxes, you’re contributing to these lands.

Become a FREE CAMPING INSIDER and join the 100,000 campers that love to score the best site! 

We’ll send you the 50 Best Free Campsites in the USA (one per state). Access the list by submitting your email below:

%d bloggers like this: