Skip to Content

What Is Foodie ASMR?

What Is Foodie ASMR?

ASMR isn’t everyone’s cup of tea, but it has gone viral for the past couple of years. Some of the most popular ASMR videos on YouTube have nearly half a billion views. You can find millions of soothing and relaxing videos on YouTube. One trending category of these videos is foodie ASMR.

So what does this mean, and why is it so popular? Let’s find out!

What Is ASMR and How Does It Work?

ASMR is an acronym for “autonomous sensory meridian response.” This is the tingling or goosebump sensation that travels down your scalp, the back of the neck, and the spine. 

Many people experience this response due to triggers from audible or visual stimuli. Those who enjoy ASMR find it very relaxing and even soothing. Some individuals claim to experience reduced heart rates and lower anxiety while enjoying these videos.

As people watch the images on the screen and hear the noises, it activates a physiological response in the individual’s brain. The stimuli activate a response in the body that can help relieve stress and chronic pain and could be a tool to help battle insomnia, depression, and various anxiety symptoms.

Over the last several years, ASMR has become incredibly popular, especially on YouTube. For many, it’s similar to when you pass a car accident on the highway. You tell yourself you’re not going to look, but you find it hard to look away from the scene once you do.

However, people truly enjoy ASMR videos and find them to be helpful. Those who struggle with insomnia, anxiety, and depression sometimes find it helps with their chronic symptoms. 

Those who find that the videos help them often want others to experience the same. They may even go on to create their own ASMR videos to help others experience the same benefits. 

Pro Tip: Are you a foodie? You’ll love eating at these 7 Most Unique Restaurants in the USA.

Man eating ramen when recording ASMR
Try listening to ASMR to relax and unwind.

What Is Foodie ASMR?

The purpose of ASMR videos is to activate those stimuli so you’ll experience that autonomous sensory meridian response. Foodie ASMR content magnifies the sounds of eating. 

This includes the sound of the individual’s exaggerated chewing, touching, and even cutting the food items. Some popular foodie ASMR videos feature honeycombs, chips, and other brightly colored and texture-filled foods.

Why Do People Watch ASMR Eating?

Just like other autonomous sensory meridian response categories, ASMR eating can help some people relax. 

According to an article by Reporter, some researchers call it “visual hunger.” This is where you are essentially eating with your eyes and ears but not your mouth. Simply looking at and hearing the chewing sounds can nearly recreate the eating experience.

People watch ASMR eating for various reasons. While some people find the noises relaxing or calming, others might find it helps them battle eating disorders. 

On the other hand, these videos could also induce eating disorders in individuals. You must know how these foodie ASMR videos affect you and whether they help or hurt your overall well-being.

Woman eating cooking while recording ASMR
For some, listening to foodie ASMR can help evoke a state of calm and peace.

Who Started ASMR Eating?

The trend first started in Korea in the late 2000s. “Mukbang” videos became increasingly popular in the country. 

These videos started as a way for solo eaters to have some company while enjoying a meal alone. These people would jump on social media and interact with friends and followers who happened to join their live stream session while they ate.

It wasn’t long before the trend morphed from focusing on connecting with others to the food itself. Those filming themselves would take on food challenges or challenge themselves to eat as much food as possible. 

With the rise of foodie ASMR, content creators beefed up their microphones and began focusing on finding foods that created the maximum autonomous sensory meridian response.

Is ASMR Good for Anxiety?

Many people find that ASMR helps calm their anxiety and helps them to relax. An article by Nebraska Medicine cites two studies on the topic. Dr. David E. Warren of the University of Nebraska Medical Center said this stimulus can provoke physiological responses in the brain and body. 

However, he also states, “Is there empirical evidence that ASMR reliably changes mood or has lasting effects on mental health? No, there is not.” Though, he’s not discounting the fact that ASMR could be beneficial for some individuals.

Dr. Warren also stated, “There have not yet been large-scale clinical trials demonstrating the efficacy of ASMR stimuli for those important mental health attributes.” 

Luckily, foodie ASMR appears to be safe to use for most people. Hopefully, professionals will do more research in the coming years, and it can become a helpful method for individuals dealing with anxiety. 

Pro Tip: Say goodbye to cooking stress! Use these 5 Foodie Hacks for Easy Camping Meals.

Is Foodie ASMR Worth It?

Foodie ASMR can be a great tool for some individuals. However, you must stay aware of how it affects you. Stop consuming the content as quickly as possible if you notice any adverse mental health effects or eating disorder issues. 

Some people find it a relaxing way to end their day, similar to those who enjoy watching any of the millions of cat videos littering the internet. Each person has different responses to stimuli.

Do you like listening to ASMR? Tell us your thoughts in the comments.

Discover the Best Free Camping Across the USA

To be honest with you, we hate paying for camping. There are so many free campsites in America (with complete privacy).

You should give it a try!

As a matter of fact, these free campsites are yours. Every time you pay federal taxes, you’re contributing to these lands.

Become a FREE CAMPING INSIDER and join the 100,000 campers that love to score the best site! 

We’ll send you the 50 Best Free Campsites in the USA (one per state). Access the list by submitting your email below:

%d bloggers like this: