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Do Teardrop Campers Hold Value?

Do Teardrop Campers Hold Value?

Do Teardrop Campers Hold Value?

Teardrop campers are cute, fun, and surprisingly practical. But do they hold their value? 

We’ve dissected the ins and outs of these campers. Sit back as we reveal what we found, and we’ll let you know if a teardrop camper is worth buying. 

Let’s dig in!

What Is a Teardrop Camper?

A teardrop camper is a compact, lightweight travel trailer. It gets its name because of its shape. The rear roof of the camper slopes down to the bumper to create the form of a teardrop. The shape and size make them relatively straightforward to tow by small and large vehicles alike.

Some are similar to a hatchback where the back can open to reveal storage or an outdoor kitchen.

These “hatchbacks” are nice because there’s usually limited standing room inside, so it extends your living space outdoors. Others that don’t have an open back have extra room inside for a bed or dinette in the rear.

Family singing in front of teardrop camper.
Lightweight and easy to tow, teardrop campers are an excellent compact camper option!

The Benefits of a Teardrop Camper?

Teardrop campers are lightweight, and an SUV can pull most. You’ll save money on gas mileage and your tow vehicle–no need to upgrade your car to something larger for towing. 

Some of these compact campers can even fit inside a garage, making them easy to store when not in use. And because they’re a small RV, they’re easy to maneuver, park, and backup. 

Other benefits of a teardrop include practical options such as an outdoor kitchen. It alleviates a mess and odors when cooking inside a camper. For travelers wanting to camp with more amenities and not deal with a large RV, teardrops provide a warm and dry shelter versus a tent. 

Some even have a toilet or wet bath. While teardrops are not roomy by any means, you might be surprised at some of the amenities that can fit inside these compact trailers. 

Pro Tip: Want to invest in a teardrop camper? We found the 5 Best Teardrop Campers in 2021.

Teardrops are aesthetically pleasing and trendy.

Similar to the Airstream or Skoolie communities, teardrop campers have a following, and they band together. But what really makes them popular is their towability, easy setup, size, and comfort.  

SUV towing teardrop camper parked next to ocean.
Take your teardrop camper on your next great adventure.

What Is the Average Price of a Teardrop?

The cost of a teardrop camper varies across the industry. You can find a new lower-end model for $8,000-$15,000. For example, the Oregon Trailer FronTear starts at $14,000. It sleeps two people and has a rear outdoor kitchen.

Luxury and customized teardrops can run over $20,000. For example, the Little Guy Max comes with a wet bath, modern decor, plenty of storage, and lots of features. It sells for just under $40,000. 

Why Are Teardrop Campers So Expensive?

Teardrop campers that run over $20,000 are typically custom built and have higher-end features. Sometimes, smaller appliances, amenities, and features cost more to fit into a small space.

When standard-sized furniture and appliances don’t fit in your camper, you have to pay more for customized sizing.  

The Little Guy Max is an excellent example of a luxury teardrop that includes a wet bath, an indoor kitchen, skylights, and more. Adding these amenities increases the costs so it can add up fast. 

Blue teardrop camper parked in front of building.
Teardrop campers hold their value better than other RVs.

What Affects the Price of a Teardrop?

Other effects on the price of a teardrop include additional features. Adding things like off-road tires, TVs, kitchen upgrades, flooring modifications, etc., all drive up the price. In addition, if you’re purchasing a custom-built teardrop camper, the price will be higher than a mass-produced model. 

Construction materials and quality also influence the price. For example, teardrops that can withstand off-roading and extreme weather should have higher quality construction and insulation, meaning higher expenses in materials and labor.

And with material costs being at an all-time high right now, supply and demand is also a factor.

Pro Tip: Before you drop a pretty penny on a teardrop camper, make sure you know about these 5 Reasons to Avoid a Teardrop Camper.

Do Teardrop Campers Hold Value?

You may be surprised to learn that teardrop campers hold their value better than other RVs. They’re low maintenance, practical, at a lower price point, and extremely popular. 

Of course, this doesn’t mean they won’t depreciate about 20% when driven off the dealer’s lot, as is expected with any RV. But they tend to depreciate slower each year after when compared with a standard travel trailer.  

Since teardrops are tiny and have fewer bells and whistles than larger RVs, the maintenance costs should be relatively low. This is also a value-add for those purchasing used models.

They’re also appealing due to their practical functionality–minimalists love that kind of thing. They tend to have a more “old-school campy” vibe.

And while some teardrops run upwards of $40,000 or more, you can get into one for less than $10,000, making this camper style very appealing for the budget-conscious. 

Are Teardrop Campers Worth Buying?

The bottom line is, teardrop campers can be fantastic. They’re so easy to tow, set up, and enjoy. They’re not ideal for large families or those who want to stretch out. 

But these campers could even be an ideal choice for a second camper. If you already have a large RV that you park for long periods or have a seasonal spot, a teardrop would be great for weekend getaways or short trips.

It could come in handy and save you a lot in gas mileage. 

If you get into a teardrop camper, let us know. We’d love to hear about your experience!

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JIM KIBLER

Friday 5th of November 2021

I beg to differ with you re teardrop campers are easier to back up. I was an owner, dealer and MFG Rep for over 30 years. Backing up a travel trailer is basically a series of corrections to choose the desired position and location of the trailer. The driver looks for movement of the rear of the trailer to the right or left. The distance between the trailer axle and the rearmost part of the trailer will determine the amount of movement. With a longer trailer, the driver will be able to see this much easier and much sooner than with a short trailer.

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